Designer Victor Glemaud on Why Optimism is an Asset in the Fashion Industry

January 11, 2020

What we’ve learned from designer Victor Glemaud’s self-described meandering path to creating his eponymous label, is that trusting your gut and an optimistic outlook are key when forging your own path. It’s that optimism and intention that led the NY-based, Haitin-born designer to ask Patrick Robinson, the visionary behind brands like Gap and Paco Rabanne, if he could work for him—a kismet run-in at a grocery store.

That courage (and weekly phone calls to Robinson’s office for six months) led to a one-off job that put Glemaud quite literally at the feet of fashion’s finest—rolling lint off the shoes of Gisel and Alek Wek pre-runway show. From then on, Glemaud worked across every facet of the industry, from making patterns to perfecting margins, and eventually used his breadth of knowledge to create Victor Glemaud.

The brand is known for its new take on knitwear, with separates, dresses and jumpsuits in bold colorways so beautifully executed, wearing them can make you feel sunshine on even the grayest of days. Some might say — and some being the likes of Selena Gomez, Issa Rae, and Dakota Johnson — it’s as if his sunny disposition is knit into the garment itself. 

We recently visited Glemaud at his showroom, fittingly located in Manhattan’s Garment District, to chat about career, creativity and the inspiration behind his most recent collection – now available on RTR

Describe your brand in 5 words or less.
Joy. Optimistic. Colorful. Groovy. Fun.

What’s the inspiration behind this collection?
Resort 2020 was inspired by the thought of how a young Grace Jones would express her bold, creative energy today. 

You’re a self-described optimist. Is it important to have that attitude in the fashion industry?
Fashion is a roller coaster of emotions, sometimes all in one day. Optimism in any creative sphere is important.

How has your heritage informed your designs?
My culture manifests itself in a joyful, sunny outlook on how people should dress. 

How do you get into the creative zone?
I start each collection by seeing beautiful things. I visit galleries, museums, go to the cinema, watch TV and read books, newspapers and magazines.

When the day’s over, how do you unwind?
If I have no evening commitments, I like cooking dinner at home and watching a show with my husband.

First fashion memory: 
My first internship involved working on my first fashion show where I lint brushed the girls’ shoes. The girls were Giselle and Alek Wek. 

Biggest fashion regret: 
None!

Biggest fashion crush:
The Dutch duo — fashion photographers Inez + Vinoodh.

Best advice you’ve ever received:  
Be your authentic self.

WATCH: Go behind-the-scenes with Victor Glemaud

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